Putting Faces On the Textile Industry: The Workers of the Amoskeg Manufacturing

by on March 21, 2018 in Home Page

Image result for amoskeag millsAt the Olivia Rodham Memorial Library in Nelson

Saturday, March 24th at 11am

Daily life for the Amoskeag Manufacturing Company’s textile worker was not easy. Robert Perreault sheds light on how people from a variety of European countries as well as from French Canada made the transition from an agrarian to an industrial society and how that change affected families, cultures, the nature of work, and relationships among workers themselves.

Robert B. Perreault has worked as a research assistant/oral history interviewer, librarian/archivist, freelance writer, historical tour guide, public speaker, photographer, and conversational French teacher to promote Manchester’s history and New England’s Franco-American culture since 1973. His works of nonfiction and fiction, written in French, in English or in both languages, include seven books and more than 160 articles, essays, and short stories published in the US, Canada and France. Perreault holds an MA in French with specialization in New England Franco-American studies from Rhode Island College and an MFA in Creative Writing/Fiction from Southern New Hampshire University. In June 2012, Manchester’s Centre Franco-Américain named him “Franco-American of the Year.”

Nelson Election Results

by on March 14, 2018 in Home Page, Town Government

Election Results 2018

Selectman David Upton
Moderator Lewis Derby
Trustee of the Library Lewis Derby
Trustee of the Trust Funds Thomas Newcombe
Cemetery Board Marty French – Write In
Nelson Fire & Rescue Equipment Committee John Bunce
  Barbara Roland
  Bob Lenox
Supervisors of the Checklist Anita Flanagan
Emergency Management Officer Dennis Dellagreca
Planning Board Member Mark Levine
Zoning Board of Adjustment John Cucchi
  Dennis Dellagreca
Road Equipment Committee John Bunce
Treasurer John Shea

Two NH Poets Reading in Nelson

by on March 6, 2018 in Home Page, Uncategorized

March 10 at 11 am at the Olivia Rodham Memorial Library


The poems in Begin with Trouble by Martha Carlson-Bradley often lift, erase, disarrange, or
subvert the language of the 1727 New-England Primer—a book read by children
in New England and beyond throughout the eighteenth century and into the
nineteenth. Begin with Trouble captures different voices in the Puritan community,
from white Puritan children struggling with class and mortality, duty
and the afterlife, to a Native American survivor of internment and an enslaved
young man from Africa.
As poet Diane Gilliam remarks, “Martha Carlson-Bradley brings to the
fore, with her own sharp-edged lines, the mortality of all humanly formulated
mandates that arise from the great transpersonal stories. . . . [She] has given us
the kind of book on which our lives depend.”
Martha Carlson-Bradley is the author of several poetry collections and
her poems have been published in many literary
magazines and anthologies. Her awards include
the Robert and Charlotte Baron Fellowship
from the American Antiquarian Society and
an Individual Artist Fellowship from the New
Hampshire State Council on the Arts. CarlsonBradley
has a PhD in English from the University
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, an MFA in
Creative Writing from Warren Wilson College,
and a BA in English from Salem State College.

Beating the Bounds, a book by Liz Ahl that explores intersecting
natural and human-made landscapes, “settling down” into domesticity and
community, and what it means to find and make a home.
Readers will recognize places and elements of their lives in many of these
poems—three-season camps, town meetings, rutted mud-season roads, farm
stand sweet corn, and chores like splitting firewood or making trips to the
transfer station.
As fellow poet Ann Hudson shares, “Ahl explores psychological and literal
geographies, what it means to inhabit a space, and the beauties and mysteries
she discovers there. . . . These dazzling poems draw us in to the vibrant spaces
they mark and make.”
Liz Ahl is the author of the poetry collections Home Economics (Seven
Kitchens Press, 2016), Talking About the Weather (Seven Kitchens Press, 2012),
Luck (Pecan Grove Press, 2010), and A Thirst That’s Partly Mine (winner of the
2008 Slapering Hol Press chapbook contest).
Luck received the Reader’s Choice in Poetry
award at the 2011 New Hampshire Literary
Awards. Her poems have appeared in numerous
literary journals, including Prairie Schooner,
Atlanta Review, Able Muse, Measure, Crab
Orchard Review, River Styx, and North American
Review, among others. Her work has also
been included in several anthologies, including
This Assignment is So Gay: LGBTIQ Poets on
the Art of Teaching (Sibling Rivalry Press, 2013), Mischief, Caprice, and Other
Poetic Strategies (Red Hen Press, 2004), and A Face to Meet the Faces: An Anthology
of Contemporary Persona Poetry (University of Akron Press, 2012). She has
been awarded residencies at Playa, Jentel, The Writers’ Colony at Dairy Hollow,
The Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts, and The Vermont Studio Center.
She teaches at Plymouth State University in Plymouth, New Hampshire.

Mayfair Farm Behind the scenes with Craig Thompson

by on February 22, 2018 in Ag Com, Home Page

February 24 – Mayfair Farm Behind the scenes with Craig Thompson


Craig will share how they found Harrisville, their trials and successes and daily life on a farm. If you’ve ever enjoyed Mayfair’s dinners, shopped at the farm store or picked berries and been curious about their operation, then this discussion is for you.

They are a small scale, diversified family farm and kitchen in Harrisville, New Hampshire. The unique combination of quality, local farm products, an onsite commercial kitchen, and personalized client attention offer true farm-to-table catering and events with an emphasis on seasonal, local menus.

Nelson Agricultural Commission 2018 Lecture Series

Sophie & Fiachra: Music of Quebec and Ireland

by on February 22, 2018 in Home Page
 – February 25 – 3:00 PM –
     Described as “Invigorating” by The Irish Times, Sophie & Fiachra take the Traditional Music of Quebec and Ireland and mate it  in a unique way, remaining true to their roots while creating a new and original sound.
     Their sound is rooted in the Fiddle playing and singing of Quebecoise Sophie Lavoie, the uilleann piping and Banjo playing of Fiachra O’Regan from Ireland. Their sound is sweetened all the more by Gaelic and French Canadian song arrangements.
“This is Irish Music with a Quebecois Twist at it’s very, very best” said Mike Harding. This is no surprise given Sophie & Fiachra’s track record with delighted audiences throughout the world – and their deep love for, and intimacy with their respective musical traditions.
Larry Ames 
Monadnock Folklore Society

Double Feature with a Buffet: Amy Beach–Listening for the Birds and Kettle Of One With Eric Masterson

by on February 20, 2018 in Home Page

Olivia Rodham Memorial Library in Nelson

Presents an exploration of the life of an American composer, including 18 illustrated biographical panels and music.

Amy Beach–Listening for the Birds”

Thursday, February 22nd at 6pm

Buffet Style light meal provided.

For more information call the library at 603-847-3214.

Kettle Of One
With Eric Masterson
Thursday, February 22, 2018 at 7:00 pm
Nelson Town Hall
Many of us dream of following migrating birds to warmer climates for the winter, but few people actually do it. Eric Masterson did – by bicycle.
Both programs are free and open to the public


Hike and Cookout at Spoonwood Pond Dam

by on February 9, 2018 in Hikes and Nature, Home Page
These Pictures are from 2018 hike.
Saturday, February 3, 2018 at 10:30 am
Join the Nelson Trail Committee for a leisurely walk across the ice of Nubanusit Lake, through the isthmus of Louis Cabot Preserve, across pristine Spoonwood Pond to the 1859 vintage 12’ high and 280’ long dam & spillway. For 111 years, that water impoundment, in addition to the Nubanusit Lake impoundment beginning in 1861, provided most of the energy to power Harrisville’s woolen mills until 1970.
At the dam, the Trail Committee will host a free cookout and provide hot dogs, chips and hot chocolate. Depending on conditions, bring ice walkers (such as STABILicers or Yaktrax), boots, snowshoes or cross country skis  – your choice. As of January 27, only ice walkers are appropriate. There is no snow on the lakes.
Round trip: 4 miles. Total elevation gain: 0 feet. Meet at Dave Birchenough’s (827-3552) at 162 Nubanusit Road, Nelson  on February 3 at 10:30 AM. We should be back by 2:30 PM. Families and pets are welcome.
If you plan to participate, and have not previously signed up, please click this link to sign up. That will help us plan for the cookout. If weather causes a cancellation or postponement, we will notify you by email – if you’ve signed up.
Looking northeast at Nubanusit Lake from the Spoonwood Pond Dam

Willa Cather

by on February 7, 2018 in Home Page

Kindness and Cruelty
​(a musical about Willa Cather)

Nelson library, Saturday at 11 am on February17th

This enthralling three woman show centers on the summer Willa Cather spent in Jaffrey, NH when she was writing ​Sapphira and the Slave Girl​.  This show is written by William Ogmundson and Tom Dunn, and Mary Niederkorn, Jocelyn Duford and Rachel Coffin star.


Rudyard Kipling In NH Humanities Living History Presentation

by on February 1, 2018 in Home Page

Language and Literature, Living History at the Nelson Library on Saturday February 10th at 11 am.

Rudyard Kipling was the most internationally-celebrated author of his day. The first four years of his marriage and fatherhood were spent in New England where he built his dream house – Naulakha in Dummerston, Vermont – now preserved as a Landmark Trust property. It was there that he penned The Jungle Bookand other classics. These were productive and happy years for the young literary giant, but eventually deeply troubled.


Learn to Draw Zen Tangles

by on January 29, 2018 in Home Page, Library

by on January 23, 2018 in Home Page



The following is a list of town positions to be voted on at our next town meeting – March 13, 2018. The business portion of the meeting will be held on Saturday March 17 at 10 AM


Selectmen 1…………… 3 years

Moderator 1 ……………2 years

Treasurer 1………………. 1 year

Trustees of Trust Fund 1 …………3 years

Cemetery Board member 2………… 3 years

Supervisors of the Checklist 1………. 6 years

Trustees of the Library 1 ……………..3 years

Planning Board 2 …………………………..3 years

Zoning Board of Adjustment 3…………… 3 years

Road Equipment Committee 1 ……………3 years

Emergency Management Officer 1 …………1 year





All candidates who file on the last day of the filing period shall do so in person before the town clerk. RSA 669:10 through RSA 669:19. The Town Office will be open on February 2 from 3 to 5 pm

– The Mighty Oak – From firewood to baked goods

by on January 23, 2018 in Ag Com, Home Page

Nelson Agricultural Commission 2018 Lecture Series

January 27The Mighty Oak – From firewood to baked goods with

Beth Draper and Rob Germeroth

Our oak trees provide winter heat and acorns for baked goods. Beth and Rob will share their experiences making acorn flour. Be sure to attend and taste these nutrious products.

February 24Mayfair Farm Behind the scenes with Craig Thompson

Craig will share how they found Harrisville, their trials and successes and daily life on a farm. If you’ve ever enjoyed Mayfair’s dinners, shopped at the farm store or picked berries and been curious about their operation, then this discussion is for you.

March 31Protect your garden from critters or Seed Starting – Subject yet to be determined.

April 28Pruning Apple Trees with Ted Lenk

This will be a hands on demonstration pruning Apple trees at the Nelson Library.

May 19Soil Workshop – Instructors TBA

Curious about no-till gardening, making soil with hugelkultur, discover how to determine the make-up of your soil. Bring your questions, a jar and a scoop of your soil to this hands on workshop. Rain or shine.

All lectures are free and open to the public.

They take place at 11am in the

Olivia Rodham Public Library, 1 Nelson Common Rd, Nelson, NH.

Annual Solstice Party

by on December 10, 2017 in Home Page
The Monadnock Folklore Society’s


Saturday, December 16 

 7:00 PM 

The Monadnock Folklore Society brings this community event to the Nelson Town Hall each year,

 admission is $5, and treats are appreciated for the dessert potluck.

This year the evening will begin with a holiday concert featuring a selection of traditional and original seasonal music performed by The Solstice Sisters(Alouette Iselin, Melanie Everard, Kim Wallach, & Heather Bower) and friends; as part of the concert, 2017 Johnny Trombly Scholarship recipient Elias Elliot will perform. The Folklore Society invites you to bring along your favorite holiday dessert and we’ll supply the beverages for the intermission. After the concert the chairs and benches are cleared to make way for a traditional New England Contradance. Unfortunately, or not, the dance is often interrupted by various groups of unsavory characters presenting their idea of seasonal entertainment. These diversions, sometimes involving costumed individuals making complete fools of themselves or performing ancient ritual dances to help us through this dark time of the year, are generally tolerated as once they are applauded and fed we can return to dancing the night away.

Larry Ames 
Monadnock Folklore Society


Sonobe Cubes

by on December 10, 2017 in Home Page


by on December 6, 2017 in Home Page

Movie Night

by on December 6, 2017 in Home Page, Library

The Monadnock Folklore Society presents JEFF WARNER

by on October 26, 2017 in Home Page
Friday, November 10 ~ 8:00 PM

 photographed at Strawbery Banke Museum, Portsmouth, NH by Ralph Morang

 The Monadnock Folklore Society presents a concert on Friday, November 10th, commemorating the 250th anniversary of the founding of the town of Nelson, featuring folklorist Jeff Warner performing Songs of Old New Hampshire.

Drawing heavily on the repertoire of traditional singer Lena Bourne Fish (1873-1945) of Jaffrey and Temple, New Hampshire, Jeff Warner offers the songs and stories that, in the words of Carl Sandburg, tell us “where we came from and what brought us along.” These ballads, love songs and comic pieces, reveal the experiences and emotions of daily life in the days before movies, sound recordings and, for some, books. Songs from the lumber camps, the decks of sailing ships, the textile mills and the war between the sexes offer views of pre-industrial New England and a chance to hear living artifacts from the 18th and 19th centuries.

Jeff Warner connects 21st-century audiences with the music and everyday lives of 19th-century people. Warner accompanies his songs on concertina, banjo, guitar and several “pocket instruments,” such as bones and Jew’s harp. Warner is a Folklorist and Community Scholar for the New Hampshire State Council on the Arts and was a 2007 State Arts Council Fellow. He has toured nationally for the Smithsonian Institution and has recorded for Flying Fish/Rounder Records and other labels. Jeff Warner’s web page: http://www.jeffwarner.com

The concert begins at 8:00 PM and admission is free thanks to the generosity of the Town of Nelson and a grant from the New Hampshire Humanities Council.

The concert will take place in the historic Town Hall in Nelson, NH at 7 Nelson Common Road. For more information call 603-762-0235 or visit http://monadnockfolk.org.

The Frost King and the Gilmore Family Nubanusit Legacy

by on October 26, 2017 in Home Page, Library

Ever kayaked past those classic boathouses on Lake Nubanusit and wondered about their histories?

They started with a lightbulb!

To learn more, come to a Nelson History Moment

 Olivia Rodham Memorial Library

 Saturday, November 4th

 11 am to noon

Nelson’s John Wengler will present

“The Frost King and the Gilmore Family Nubanusit Legacy.”

Nelson Library Movie Night, Oct 18th, Wednesday at 6pm

by on October 18, 2017 in Home Page, Library

On the run from Nazis, three Italian Jewish brothers spent months during their childhood hiding in a cave in the Tuscan countryside. Nearly 70 years later, after emigrating to Israel, the three reunite in the country they were forced to abandon and rediscover their hiding place. “For years I’ve wanted to find that cave, the place to which we owe our lives,” says Bubi, the youngest of the trio.

Amid hearty Tuscan meals and sweeping landscapes, the octogenarians’ quest unexpectedly swells with humor and clashing memories in Shalom Italia.

Retracing their steps, the brothers in Shalom Italia are as different as can be. Emmanuel, the oldest and a world-renowned anthropologist and archaeologist based in Israel, simply recalls misery and only agrees to the journey to make Bubi happy. “Why search for it? I don’t want to remember,” he says.

Meanwhile, Andrea, an athletic physicist just two years younger than Emmanuel, remembers an enchanted childhood: “Those were wonderful times. We lived in the woods, played Robin Hood and collected mushrooms. I had fun during the Holocaust.”

However, Bubi, 4 1/2 at the time, barely remembers the cave. “I don’t know whether family stories and my memories overlapped. It’s all a bit vague.”

“It’s human for our memories–personal or shared–to become a source of our identity,” said filmmaker Tamar Tal Anati. “Whether that memory comes from one ‘truth’ is explored by Bubi, Emmanuel and Andrea. Often it seems any particular moment can only be accurately constructed when everyone is involved, as each person’s particular recollection of an event helps piece together a larger mosaic of a shared experience. I hope Shalom Italia will inspire American audiences to reexamine their own stories and history.”

Unalike as they are, Bubi, Andrea and Emmanuel are undoubtedly brothers. They bicker over driving directions, recipes and how exactly their time in the cave should be remembered. Probing the boundaries between history and myth, the brothers soon learn their memories are not so easily unraveled. They can’t agree whether the family hid valuables with a village neighbor, or whether the bow and arrows they played with in the woods were bought at a store or fashioned by hand. “History is full of doubts,” Emmanuel, says, to which Bubi impatiently replies, “You keep doubting and contradicting everything and saying it’s not true over and over again.”

Adventures in Geneology

by on October 11, 2017 in Home Page

Old Car

Olivia Rodham Memorial Library

11 am, Saturday, October 14th

Learn about your family ancestry using the “free at the library” resource called ancestrylibrary.com.

Elizabeth Williams will help you navigate this on line.

She will also show some exciting connections in Nelson that she has researched. For more info. call 603-847-3214.

Bring a computer or sign up for one of ours.